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The Punch for All Your Drinks

Even though drinking a dry gin and tonic would not protect you from the coronavirus, there are other reasons to indulge in a cocktail. Here are a few scientifically supported reasons to indulge in gin in moderation.

The following is the nutritional information for dry gin:

Compared to other alcoholic beverages such as beer and wine, one serving of dry gin contains fewer calories and carbohydrates than the equivalent serving of other beverages. It contains no added sugars when consumed on its own. The following is the nutritional information for one shot of dry gin (1.5 fluid ounces):

One shot of dry gin (about 1.5 ounces):

  • There are 97 calories in one serving.
  • There are no carbs in this meal.
  • 0 g of dietary fibre
  • 0 grammes of protein
  • 0 g of added sugar

Perhaps it will be beneficial to your skin.

Gin is infused with juniper berries, which are often thought to be a “superfood,” even though there is no technical definition for the phrase. Intensely packed with antioxidants, juniper berries provide a variety of health-promoting advantages ranging from improved skin health to protection against chronic illnesses such as cancer and heart disease. According to research published in the journal Antioxidants, juniper berries contain some of the same antioxidants as tea tree oil, which has been shown to support healthy skin. In a separate study published in the journal Industrial Crops and Products, researchers discovered that juniper berry essential oil might also have anti-ageing qualities, which may help to keep wrinkles at bay. However, suppose you’re sipping dry gin and tonics in the sun. In that case, you should be aware that lime juice can irritate the skin when exposed to direct sunlight, potentially resulting in a disease known as phyto photo dermatitis.

Is it possible to live a longer life after consuming it?

Gin’s high concentration of antioxidants might benefit more than simply your skin. It has been shown in certain studies that juniper berries have anti-ageing and anti-inflammatory characteristics, which can enhance health and perhaps contribute to a longer life by boosting blood flow and toxin clearance from the circulation. Aside from that, Julia Child was certain that dry gin was one of the keys to long life, and who are we to dispute with her?

It prepares your digestive system.

Various cultures like drinking dry gin as an aperitif (a drink offered before a meal), believing that it will assist in preparing one’s digestive system for the next meal. Indeed, it has been discovered that consuming alcohol before a meal might increase appetite. Pre-dinner dry gin cocktails may also help you appreciate your meal more because they prepare you to eat quickly. One study discovered that people who were given alcohol before their meal had a stronger sensitivity to the scents of their food.

An alcoholic beverage that is diabetic-friendly

On their own, spirits like dry gin contain no carbs, making them a smart choice for those with diabetes who want to avoid carbohydrates in their drinks. Traditionally, dry gin is blended with tonic water, likewise low in carbohydrates, with only 15 g of sugar per 8-ounce glass of the beverage. However, it is crucial to examine the mixers that you use in your dry gin cocktails while creating your concoctions. It may be beneficial for someone with diabetes to choose mixers that include no added sugar or diet mixers that use an artificial sugar alternative. Additionally, moderation is crucial for everyone, but it is especially critical for individuals with diabetes since excessive drinking can result in hypoglycemia (or low blood sugar).

To be clear, dry gin is not a miraculous meal, and it is recommended that you take alcohol in moderation. However, there are a few significant advantages to consuming juniper-flavoured liqueur in moderation. Pour yourself a glass of our Watermelon dry gin Fizz, or combine your favourite dry gin and tonic water.

 

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